What are the different settings Available in Rivatuner?

Are you curious about the different settings that are available in Rivatuner? This software is designed to help you fine-tune your graphics card so that you can get the most out of it. RivaTuner is one of the most popular graphics card overclocking and monitoring utilities currently available.

It supports a wide range of graphics cards, from the very old to the very new, and has multiple settings that can be tweaked for performance gains. In this post, we’ll take a look at the different settings that are available in Rivatuner.

We’ll also discuss how to use each setting to achieve optimal performance. So, if you’re looking to get the most out of your graphics card, be sure to keep reading!

What is Rivatuner?

Rivatuner is one of the most popular GPU overclocking and monitoring software. It has a variety of settings to help you get the most out of your graphics card.

If you’re a PC gamer, there’s a good chance that you’ve heard of Rivatuner. It’s one of the most popular overclocking and monitoring tools available, and for good reason. It has a ton of features and settings that you can tweak to get the most out of your system.

What are the different settings Available in Rivatuner?

The Graphics Adapter settings dialog contains an extensive list of options for fine-tuning your graphics card. While some of these options are well documented, others are not. Here’s the full list of what each option does:

GPU core clock – This value affects how many calculations are done with each rendered frame. Increasing the core clock may improve your framerate, but it could also reduce stability and increase heat and noise output from your graphics card.

In this post, we’ll take a look at the different settings that are available in Rivatuner. We’ll also discuss how to use each setting to achieve optimal performance. So, if you’re looking to get the most out of your graphics card, be sure to keep reading!

Keep in mind that there is no one-size-fits-all setting; you may need to experiment to find the best configuration for your system.

Overclocking mode – This allows you to choose from three overclocking modes:

  1. Manual – If you choose this setting, only those sliders that are available for modification will be displayed, and you can adjust them as necessary. You should only change the core clock, memory clock, and voltage sliders if you know what you’re doing, since excessive overclocking may damage your graphics card or CPU.

2. Profile selection – If you choose this setting, a list of profiles will appear from which you can choose. A profile consists of a core clock, memory clock, and voltage setting for your GPU and CPU (if supported by the motherboard), which will be automatically applied whenever you start the computer or enter a game or application that makes full use of your graphics card(s).

3. Automatic – If you choose this setting, all overclocking-related settings will be set to their maximum values (or whatever is considered safe for your graphics card), and overclocking will be enabled whenever you start the computer or enter a game or application that makes full use of your graphics card(s).

GPU shader clock – This value affects how many calculations are done for all non-graphic effects to a scene (lighting, transforms, etc). As with the GPU core clock, increasing the shader clock may improve your framerate, but it could also reduce stability and increase heat and noise output from your graphics card.

GPU memory clock – This value affects how many bytes of data are sent to the graphics card for rendering each frame.

GPU memory domain – The GDDR5 RAM chips on some graphics cards are divided into several “memory banks”, and each bank has its own clock rate. The memory domain setting affects which memory bank is used for data output (which affects the effective memory clock).

GPU shader clock ratio – This setting only appears on higher-end graphics cards with multiple display pipelines, such as the Radeon HD 3870 X2 and Radeon 4870 X2. Increasing this value will increase your shader clock, and thus improve 3D performance. However, it can reduce stability and increase heat and noise output from your graphics card.

GPU monitoring – If this option is enabled, RivaTuner will constantly monitor the activity of your GPU’s internal sensors (i.e., the graphics card’s monitoring feature). This option is useful for finding general state of health information about your graphics card and will help you find problems with it if there are any.

GPU activity sensing – If this option is enabled, RivaTuner will constantly monitor the load on your GPU’s shader and memory processors via the internal sensors (i.e., the graphics card’s real-time monitoring feature).

This option is useful for finding information about how your card loads change as you play games and do other things on your computer, and will also help you find problems with it if there are any.

GPU power limit – The GPU power limits represent the maximum total power a graphics card can draw from the PSU before it starts to malfunction. You can set this value between -20% and 20%. Negative values will reduce the GPU power limit to 10%, whereas positive values increase it to 110% of its default value.

The default value is 0%, meaning that no additional power is provided above the card’s base power draw. This setting should be used with extreme caution, as even a small increase in power can cause your graphics card to destruct (especially if you set it too high).

Clock limit – This setting represents the maximum GPU core clock speed that can be used. The default value is 100%, meaning that there is no limitation on how much the core speed of your GPU may increase as you overclock it.

If you set the value to 0%, your card will run at its default core speed no matter how much you overclock it (note that this will also reduce your shader clock speed). Negative values are not recommended.

Power/performance mode – This option allows you to quickly switch between maximum performance and power-saving modes. You can select which mode you want to switch to by clicking the corresponding button on the right.

This option is available only if the GPU power limit setting is configured as “Programmed via host”. If this is not enabled, you will only be able to select between the power-saving and maximum performance modes.

GPU vitals – This section of RivaTuner allows you to monitor various parameters of your graphics card’s hardware and software.

GPU load level – This section allows you to monitor your GPU activity more accurately than with the “GPU activity sensing” option. All values are updated in real-time.

GPU current clock – Displays the real-time core speed of your graphics card (the default value is the maximum allowed value).

GPU Usage – Displays the percentage of the GPU’s total power that is currently in use. This value should be close to 100% when you play games and use other demanding applications (e.g., video encoding).

Memory clock – Displays your graphics card’s current memory clock (the default value is the maximum allowed value).

CPU usage – Displays the percentage of maximum allowed CPU resources that are currently in use. This value should be close to 100% when you play games and other demanding applications, but will usually be much less if you do not.

Temperature – The temperature of your GPU’s graphics processing units is measured at 30-second intervals, and may spike for a short time if the GPUs are being stressed. The maximum allowed GPU temperature is 85 degrees Celsius, which means that your graphics card has to be considered an “extremely hot” card if it reaches this value.

VRM – Displays the current load on your graphics card’s voltage regulator module, measured in watts. This value should be close to 0 when you play games or do other things on your computer, and should normally never exceed around 25 watts.

GPU vcore – This value represents the voltage of your GPU’s graphics processing units and is measured in volts.

GPU memory vcore – Displays the voltage of your graphics card’s memory chips and is measured in volts.

CPU core clock – This section allows you to monitor the speed of your computer’s processor threads (cores) and is measured in gigahertz.

Clock drift – This section allows you to see your graphics card’s current clock speed drift with respect to its base frequency (i.e., how much your core clock has changed since it was last started).

GPU voltage – Displays the current-voltage of your graphics card’s GPU, which is measured in volts. This value should be close to 1.000v when your computer is idle and should not exceed around 1.200v under full load.

GPU power – This shows you how much electricity your graphics card is using, measured in watts.

VID – Displays the current-voltage of your graphics card’s graphics processing unit, which is measured in volts.

GPU temp – This allows you to monitor the temperature of your graphics card’s GPU (in Celcius). Higher temperatures may result in lower overclocking ability and an increased risk of data corruption errors.

GPU clock offset – Allows you to manually manipulate the core speed of your GPU by using a slider or input box. You can also enable the option to reset clock speeds on application exit, which will result in your core speed being set back to its default value whenever you exit a game or application.

GPU load offset – Allows you to manually manipulate the GPU load level by using a slider or input box.

Memory clock offset – Allows you to manually manipulate the memory clock speed by using a slider or input box.

Fan speed – Displays the current speed of your graphics card’s fan, measured in rotations per minute (RPM).

GPU activity sensing – This option does not affect any of your settings, but instead allows you to see how many megabytes per second your GPU is currently processing. I do not personally use this option for overclocking, as it can cause crashes.

AMD/ATI – Enables or disables the ability to overclock AMD/ATI graphics cards.

CPU – Enables or disables the ability to overclock your processor.

Glitch fix – Sets a value of zero (0) so that neither your CPU nor GPU will ever run at less than their base clock speeds, which may prevent graphical anomalies from occurring during games and other applications. This setting should only be disabled if Rivatuner reports a “clock drift” of less than 0.000MHz while idle since it could lead to data corruption errors and other problems.

GPU load line calibration – This allows you to control how much your graphics card’s voltage will increase under GPU load. The available settings are High, Medium, Low, and Off (default). Higher values should result in higher overclocking potential but may result in an increased risk of data corruption errors.

CPU load line calibration – This allows you to control how much your processor’s voltage will increase under CPU load.

CPU voltage – This allows you to manually manipulate the voltage applied to your processor by using a slider or input box. You should only adjust this setting if you know what you’re doing, as increased voltages may damage your CPU.

1./3./5./7./8. Profiles – This allows you to pick the exact voltages for your GPU and CPU. The core voltage, memory voltage, and other values will be automatically adjusted to their optimum levels depending on the selected profile.

2./4./6./8. Core clock – Allows you to manually manipulate the base clock speed of your graphics card’s processor by using a slider or input box.

4./6./8. Voltage slider – This allows you to manually manipulate the voltage applied to your graphics card’s processor by using a slider or input box.

ASIC quality – This allows you to adjust the quality of the graphics processor (ASIC) within your graphics card. Higher-quality settings should result in better performance, but may also increase overclocking potential and an increased risk of data corruption errors.

Shader clock – This allows you to manually manipulate the base clock speed of your graphics card’s shader processor by using a slider or input box.

Wait for RTSS effect – With this enabled, RTSS (Rivatuner Statistics Server) will synchronize with Rivatuner. This is useful if you use RTSS to monitor your GPU’s temperature and fan speed, as well as logging framerate data, etc.

Test after mode – When overclocking a graphics card for the first time, it’s important to keep an eye on its stability by running a benchmarking program like FurMark or 3DMark06. If the GPU crashes, it usually means the overclock was too high and you should lower it accordingly and test again.

Use this setting to specify how many loops of a chosen benchmark you want to run before RTSS takes control back from MSI Afterburner/Trixx/RivaTuner Overclocking Utility.

Profile usage – This option enables or disables the automatic loading of profiles for certain applications such as games and benchmarks. When you enable this option, MSI Afterburner/RivaTuner Overclocking Utility will automatically change the graphics card’s clock speeds and voltages to the levels specified within the profiles for each individual game or benchmark. You can then switch between game/benchmark profiles via hotkeys.

Default – When this option is enabled, MSI Afterburner/RivaTuner Overclocking Utility will automatically change your graphics card’s clock speeds and voltages to their default values at startup or when you close your monitoring application. You can then switch between the default profile and those that will be automatically loaded for individual games and benchmarks via hotkeys.

Disable – This option disables automatic clock speed changes, so MSI Afterburner/RivaTuner Overclocking Utility will not change your graphics card’s settings until you manually open MSI Afterburner/RivaTuner Overclocking Utility and make the desired changes.

On-Screen Display (OSD) – This setting allows you to enable or disable MSI Afterburner/RivaTuner Overclocking Utility’s on-screen display.

Use advanced fan speed curve – When this option is enabled, additional advanced fan speed settings will become available which allow you to specify a custom fan speed curve that can be used with your graphics card’s fan.

Use advanced voltage curve – When this option is enabled, additional advanced voltage settings will become available which allow you to specify a custom voltage curve that can be used with your graphics card’s voltage regulation circuitry.

Enable overheat protection – This option allows you to enable or disable your graphics card’s thermal protection mechanism. If your graphics card’s GPU or memory begins to exceed its safe operating temperatures and voltage levels, the fan speed will automatically be increased and disabled if it is currently below its maximum safe speed.

So, I think you got everything you need to know about the different settings that are available in Rivatuner. Thank you for reading our article, hope it helps! If this article helped you at any point or have some sort of questions concerning something we did not mention, please leave a message on the comment section.

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